Black History Month: A Month-Long Celebration of Legacies

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This month of February, we celebrate Black History Month; And I pretty well know that every school in the good ‘ol United States of America is going to be doing special things for this very special month, which honors African-Americans who come from all walks of life.
Now, the precursor to what would become Black History Month was created as “Negro History Week”, which was celebrated on the second week of February in 1926 and announced by a historian by the name of Carter G. Woodson, along with the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History. The reason why that week had been chosen because it coincided with the birthdays of Abraham Lincoln on February 12th and Frederick Douglass on February 14th; Black communities have celebrated both of these dates together since the late 19th century.

     In 1969, black educators, as well as students known as the Black United Students, proposed the very first celebration of Black History Month; One year later, in 1970, it was celebrated at Kent State, from January 2nd to February 28th, 1970. Six years later, in 1976 to be exact, this very special month began being celebrated all across America in centers of Black culture and community centers and educational institutions such as schools. During the United States Bicentennial celebration, President Gerald Ford recognized Black History Month, while urging Americans to “seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout history.

Although Black History Month is a very important month, it is not without its share of criticism; This month is quite often the stuff of debate about its continued usefulness as well as the fairness of a designated month that is solely dedicated to a race’s history. Other people had also criticized as to why it would be appropriate to confine black history to just one month a year.
In spite of this, people still honor as well as celebrate Black History Month, a month in which all people of color are honored, whether they be from movies, television, music, art, politics, or sports.

 

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